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Disability Insurance Needs for Single People North Las Vegas NV

. There is a limit to the amount of coverage you can get; no plan will replace 100% of your income. Whatever level of coverage you pick, it should allow you to meet your normal financial obligations and should also take into account the resources you have.

Insurance Connection-Alan Bourassa
(702) 241-1036
1318 Stable Glen Drive
N Las Vegas, NV
 
StarSmiles Childrens Dentistry
(702) 639-3515
2290 McDaniel St Ste 2A
Las Vegas, NV
 
A Company, Inc.
(702) 647-4000
2701 N Simmons St
N Las Vegas, NV
 
Joel A Casar DMD
(702) 633-4333
1306 W Craig Rd Ste
Las Vegas, NV
 
Lone Mountain Dental
(702) 655-9533
4818 W Lone Mountain
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American Family Insurance-Cedric Gay
(702) 658-7536
3030 W Ann Rd Ste 110
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Lawrence A Drake, DDS
(702) 643-7720
3603 Las Vegas Blvd N Ste
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Alexander Dental Group/PDS
(702) 614-1792
3896 N Martin Luther
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Precious Dental
(702) 436-5222
4210 W Craig Rd Ste 104
Las Vegas, NV
 
Karen Hom, DDS
(702) 227-6453
7425 W Azure Dr Ste 110
Las Vegas, NV
 

Disability Insurance Needs for Single People

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Disability Insurance Needs of Single People

Even if you are single, don't overlook disability insurance. While some types of insurance, like life insurance, are less important for a single person with no dependents, disability insurance is likely even more important if you are single. Why? You have no other income to fall back on, but your own. If you suffer a loss of income, how will you pay your bills?

Here's an interesting statistic: in any given year, 1 out of every 8 people will suffer a disability of some kind from auto accident injuries to common back problems. Any of these challenges could put you off your feet if not working for an extended period. If this happens to you, a source of income would do a lot to reduce your stress, wouldnt it?

If you are working, you may have some level of disability insurance through your job. A lot of employers offer some kind of short-term disability insurance to pay you from a few days or weeks, to as much as a year. If you arent sure about your coverage, check with your human resources department or employee benefit's manual. If you do have a disability plan, and you arent enrolled, find out when you can get enrolled and how long the waiting period is.

If you don't have disability insurance through work, you should be looking at purchasing some yourself. While relatively expensive, it can be an advantage to buy this insurance yourself, because if you ever have to collect benefit's, they should be tax-free. With some careful shopping, you should be able to get a policy that fit's your needs and your budget. Always remember to shop around! Prices can vary considerably from one insurer to another.

With that in mind, what coverage do you need? Well, you should be planning to replace 50% to 70% of your current income. There is a limit to the amount of coverage you can get; no plan will replace 100% of your income. Whatever level of coverage you pick, it should allow you to meet your normal financial obligations and should also take into account the resources you have. For instance, if you have savings equivalent to 6 months of your salary, you can likely afford to take a lower level of coverage. If you don't have any savings, you should be looking at a benefit equalling 70% of your salary. Regardless of what level of coverage you pick, an emergency fund is a good idea to handle any unusual expenses associated with your time off work.

  • Claimant and physician coaching about return-to-work expectations
  • Employer education on disability issues
  • Identification of viable job alternatives, including light duty positions to allow employees to return to the workplace sooner
  • Job site modifications to accommodate disabled workers to also allow early return
  • Medical intervention to ensure the employee was receiving appropriate medical care, at all phases of treatment and recovery
  • Three-way coordination and communication between the employer, employee and physician
  • Vocationa...

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